Archive for the ‘Getting Started’ Category

New to Solar?

Posted February 15th, 2010 by SRECTrade.

We realize that many visitors of our site are learning about solar for the first time, so we thought we would put up this post by way of an introduction and some guidance on how to navigate our site. A growing number of states are implementing SREC programs. If you are new to solar, here is what you need to know:

1. Understand SRECs: For a deeper understanding of what SRECs are and how the programs work, visit our SREC Program page.

2. Find out where you are eligible to sell your SRECs: Your state may or may not have a program, however your ability to sell your SRECs into other states could have a significant impact on the value of your SRECs. You may be eligible to get your system certified in many state programs, regardless of if your state has one or not. Everyone should check our Cross-Listing post to see the states in which they may be eligible for certification.

3. Get your system installed: SRECTrade works with several installation companies. In addition, you should be able to sign up for the EasyREC service through your installer. If they do not offer the service, then feel free to contact us directly.

4. Enroll with SRECTrade: SRECTrade provides two options. If you sign up for the EasyREC service, we handle everything else including submitting your state certification applications, creating your SREC tracking account and automating the sale of your SRECs in our auction.

If you do not sign up for EasyREC, here are the additional steps:

4a. Get your system certified by your state: Once the system is installed, it is now ready to be certified by your state and any other states in which you are eligible. You can find out more on where you are eligible and how to apply on the Cross-Listing page. Every state handles this process differently, but we recommend beginning the application as soon as possible, before your installation is complete.

4b. Set up your SREC tracking account: Every state or region will use a different system for creating and tracking the SRECs. The Mid-Atlantic states use GATS, North Carolina uses NC-RETS, Massachusetts uses NE-GIS. If you opt to manage your own SRECs, you will need to have a tracking account with one of these registries. Once you have SRECs in that account, you can then post them in our auction.

4c. Create an account online with SRECTrade: This is the simplest step of all. Complete the online form to create your account and when your SRECs are available in your tracking account, log into your SRECTrade account, select the “Orders” link and place an offer to sell your SRECs.

5. Understand the timing: After you initially sign up, it will take a few months before you begin receiving payments. For example, if your system goes online on January 1st, your January generation will be recorded on February 1st. Your first SREC(s) will be actually credited to your account on March 1st. They would then be sold in the March auction, so your first payment would come in late March. After that, payments will come as SRECs are generated. Also note: some systems operate on a quarterly basis, rather than monthly.

As these processes are refined, we will continue to update this post. Please feel free to contact us any time at 877-466-4606 if you have any questions.

State SREC Markets

Posted January 28th, 2010 by SRECTrade.

The following map shows all the SREC markets in the U.S. along with the states that have a solar requirement as part of the state renewable porfolio standard (RPS).  There are three conditions that must be present in order for a state to implement an effective SREC market:

  1. RPS Solar Carve-Out: The RPS solar requirement distinguishes solar from other renewable energy resources and in most cases will value solar electricity at a higher rate than other renewables. Most states will set a target for solar, either as a percentage of the total electricity sold into the state, as a fixed capacity target in megawatts (MW) or as a solar energy target measured in megawatt hours (MWh) or SRECs produced in a year.
  2. Unbundled, Tradeable RECs: A state must allow the SRECs to be owned and traded by the generating facility. In some states, your utility company owns your SRECs. This is a common stipulation in state solar grant or rebate programs. Other states have a budget for solar. For example, California is currently not a viable SREC market because the state requires that utilities purchase the SRECs bundled with the electricity that the system produces. The SRECs cannot be unbundled and sold separately.
  3. Penalty for Non-Compliance: Finally, in order to have a robust SREC market, your state must implement some sort of fine or penalty for non-compliance. This is commonly known as a solar alternative compliance payment (SACP). The SACP is what drives the values of SRECs above any other type of REC. Without the SACP, it is difficult to incentivize buyers to pay prices that promote solar growth.

The states with robust SREC markets have the three criteria of a solar requirement, SREC ownership and the SACP. This map shows all the states that have solar requirements and those that specifically have SREC markets. In addition, we’ve added states that don’t necessarily have their own solar requirements, but are eligible to sell into the SREC markets of other states. The states that they are eligible for are listed in the map under each state.

SREC States and Solar RPS States


Cross Listing Your SRECs

Posted January 3rd, 2010 by SRECTrade.

2011 Update: State certification information can be found here

One of the benefits of the SRECTrade multi-state auction platform is the ability to cross-list in multiple states in which you have registered your SRECs. If an SREC is cross-listed, it will be included in any state in which it has been registered to be sold.  SRECs will be sold in the state auction that offers the most value. In order to qualify to sell your SRECs in a state that accepts out-of-state SRECs, you need to get your system certified in that state. The following section has information on what states accept out-of-state SRECs and how to get your systems registered and obtain a state certification number. For EasyREC customers, SRECTrade can help you register in the states available to you.

SREC Markets by State

SREC State Registration Information:

Delaware

To get a Delaware state certification number, your installation must be located in DE. You must apply to become an Eligible Energy Resource. The link for the application is here.  For more information, go to the Delaware Public Service Commission.

Contact:
Delaware Public Service Commission
861 Silver Lake Boulevard
Cannon Building, Suite 100
Dover, DE 19904
Main: (302) 736-7500
Toll-Free: (800) 282-8574
Fax: (302) 739-4849

District of Columbia

Eligible to states within and adjacent to the PJM Region. For information on the DC registration process, see DC State Certification Instructions.

Contact:
Dorothy Wideman
Commission Secretary
Public Service Commission of the District of Columbia
1333 H Street, N.W
2nd Floor West Tower
Washington, D.C. 20005

Maryland

To register in Maryland, your solar installation must be in MD and you must complete and file an application for certification as a Solar Renewable Energy Facility (REF) with the Public Service Commission. The link to the application is here.  For more complete details on the process, see Maryland SREC Registration Details.

New Jersey

New Jersey is a closed market, therefore only SRECs produced in New Jersey are eligible. New Jersey residents can apply for state certification at the New Jersey Office of Clean Energy’s website.

Contact:
New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program
c/o Conservation Services Group
75 Lincoln Highway, Suite 100
Iselin, New Jersey 08830
Phone: 866-NJSMART (866-657-6278)

North Carolina

North Carolina is still in the early stages of implementing an SREC program. The state is still accepting applications for a REC tracking system through December 15, 2009.  More information can be found on the North Carolina Utilities Commission website. A sample application can be found here.

Contact:
Chief Clerk
North Carolina Utilities Commission
4325 Mail Services Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-4325

Ohio

Utilities in Ohio are allowed to procure 50% of the SRECs from out of state facilities. However, these states must be contiguous with Ohio (PA, MI, IN, KY, WV). Instructions and forms required for Ohio certification can be found here: Application for Certification as an Ohio Renewable Energy Resource Generating Facility

Contact:
Public Utilities Commission of Ohio
Email: AEPS@puc.state.oh.us
Toll-Free: (800) 686-PUCO (7826)
Phone: (614) 466-3292 (in Columbus area)
Fax: (614) 752-8351
180 East Broad Street
Columbus, Ohio 43215
Directions to the PUCO

Pennsylvania

Utilities in Pennsylvania are allowed to buy out of state SRECs from solar generators in the PJM region to meet the Renewable Portfolio Standard. If you are interested in selling in PA, you need to get your solar system registered.  For a detailed explanation of the process with screenshots see our most recent post on Pennsylvania State Certification Registration Process.

Contact Info:
Dina M. Deana
Pennsylvania AEPS Program Manager
Clean Power Markets, Inc.
Phone: 1-877-AEPS-773 (1-877-237-7773)
Fax: (610) 444-9213
Email: paaeps@cleanpowermarkets.com



SREC Tutorial

Posted November 5th, 2009 by SRECTrade.

A 2 minute audio introduction to the SREC program.  This tutorial explains the structure of a typical SREC program and also goes into some details on how to understand the market for SRECs.  Click on the link below to listen to the audio file.

Tutorial on SRECs, why they exists, how they are traded and what dynamics affect the market

We hope this serves as useful introduction to SRECs.  For more detailed information on your specific state market, please continue to browse our blog.